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Can we have your ID please? - Understanding Differential LGBTQ+ Perceptions of the Police through a Queer Theory and Procedural Justice Lens

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posted on 2024-04-08, 10:18 authored by Miguel Kleinhens Pinto Basto AvidesMiguel Kleinhens Pinto Basto Avides

Data Description: In this dataset, 13 self-identified LGBTQ+ people are interviewed as to explore how diversity shapes LGBTQ+ perspectives of the police. The data is collected through qualitative methods with semi-structured interviews conducted with self-identified LGBTQ+ people in Rotterdam. Participants were gathered through targeted sampling mixed, then with snowball sampling. Specific participants were gathered at LGBTQ+ community events in Rotterdam. Participants ranged from 18-34 years old. The interviews were conducted in english. As a consequence, only english speaking people could be interviewed. The interviews are first audio recorded followed by a transcribed written down version of transcripts. Ensuring anonymity and participant well-being was of the utmost importance, to this end the interviews are anonymised and any relevant details are removed. Range groups are introduced to further anonymise the participants. The results demonstrate that perceptions around the police are more negative, and less homogenous than quantitative surveys indicate - even in a country where tolerance of sexual minorities is relatively high. Transcripts are analysed with the help of Atlas.ti (Used codes included), using a grounded theory approach.

The following study is approved by the Erasmus University DPAS Ethics Committee with the approval of both the Data Steward and the Privacy Officer.


Paper Abstract : Going beyond simplistic overgeneralization, this study analyses how diversity within the LGBTQ+ community is associated with differential perspectives on, and trust in, the police in Rotterdam. It utilizes queer theory concepts like heteronormativity and homonationalism to achieve a more complex and accurate understanding of LGBTQ+ perceptions and experiences, and employs procedural justice theory to understand how these perceptions and experiences result in (dis)trust in the police. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 participants in Rotterdam. The results demonstrate that perceptions around the police are more negative, and less homogenous than quantitative surveys indicate - even in a country where tolerance of sexual minorities is relatively high. Differential acceptance of diversity in queerness under the LGBTQ+ umbrella seems to be crucial in shaping LGBTQ+ perceptions of the police, with visibly queer individuals being less accepted, and often holding more negative perceptions of the police. Future research should thus expand on how the various sub-groups within the LGBTQ+ spectrum perceive the police, and how trust can be improved, for example by strengthening the visibility of the PinkinBlue unit within the police.

Funding

No Funding

History

Encoding format

  • ODT
  • ODS
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Content size

65 KB

Conditions of access

  • Open access

Language

English

Temporal coverage

2023-03-01/2024-02-19

Spatial coverage

Rotterdam

Universe

LGBTQ+

Analysis unit

An LGBTQ+ individual

Does your data contain sensitive data

  • No

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    Erasmus School of Social Science and Behavioural Science

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